Tag Archives: sustainable food

Let’s Eat In

To cook or not to cook? That is the question.  Such a simple question, too. It’s one that food activist and author Michael Pollan answered in his latest book Cooked with a resounding yes. Yet it’s a disquieting question for us humans to ask – and historically unprecedented. Read more in my Edible Blue Ridge Winter 2014 column.

Posted in Reclaiming Our Food Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Lighter Load

In a strange twist of fate, obesity may be the tipping the scales towards local foods. With the dubious distinction of becoming the fattest nation in the world in 2012, U.S. leaders are galvanizing action at all levels to address obesity…. A  2012 Cornell study reports that obesity now accounts for a whopping 21 percent of U.S. health-care costs, estimated at $190 billion per year….   A growing body of evidence even suggests that a host of everyday products are also culpable.  Read more in my Edible Blue Ridge Fall 2013 column

Posted in Reclaiming Our Food Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Delicious, Delicious History

Read Edible Blue Ridge, Spring 2013, see P14   “Imagine this: You are eagerly anticipating a heritage food festival that lasts an entire month. Friends are buzzing. Out of-state relatives are descending on your guest room. Festival banners are flapping on main streets from Scottsville to Staunton, Louisa to Lexington. he region is about to welcome several hundred thousand foodies, who, by spending two and a half times more than the average tourist, will boost the region’s economy by nearly $300 million. Another year of Central Virginia’s ViTTLE Fest (Virginia Tasting the Terroir of Local Edibles Festival) is underway, and our region is held up as an enviable … Read More

Posted in Reclaiming Our Food Blog | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

On the Huffington Post: Organic Food Not Just for Snobs, Dr. Oz

“… finally, we would get the straight dope on how we can eat well without breaking the bank…” Huffington Post op-ed featured here: Organic Food Is Not Just For Snobs, Dr. Oz.

Posted in Reclaiming Our Food Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Excerpt in GRIT: Polyface Farm Ethics-Based Anti-Wall Street Contrarian Business Practices

Polyface Farm: Ethics-Based Anti-Wall Street Contrarian Business Practices Excerpt from Reclaiming Our Food:   “No sales targets: A classic business might set a goal for selling a thousand widgets every month. And then it strives to create markets to achieve that target. Polyface Farm has decided never to set a sales target. A classic business model might suggest that Polyface should set a target to expand by 2015 to supply three Chipotle restaurants. Polyface takes a different attitude…. ”   Read Full Excerpt

Posted in News | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sustainable Traditions: Book Review of Reclaiming Our Food

[Reclaiming Our Food] is the quintessential survey of the diversity, creativity and viability of this movement. Reading this book is like going on a roadtrip with the author to meet the multitude of people and organizations that are using food as a means to renew and transform their communities…. One part photo essay, one part food system philosophy, and one part storytelling- featuring nearly 60 grassroots food projects – this is the book I have always wished someone would write to prove once and for all that there is truly a revolution happening across all our major cultural divides. There is … Read More

Posted in News | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Daily News Progress – Growing Awareness: A New Relationship With Food

Article by David Maurer: “Ancient lines of communications are being re-established between growers and urban dwellers at bustling farmers’ markets nationwide. Chickens cluck and peck happily in backyards of Charlottesville homes, and in major metropolitan settings such as Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles and New York City. Vacant lots in inner cities that once were open trash dumps now produce fresh, wholesome herbs, fruits and vegetables. These examples are not the illusionary hopes of back-to-the-earth visionaries, but realities occurring coast to coast. In a remarkable awakening, people of all ages and backgrounds are realizing something has gone terribly wrong with our commercially produced … Read More

Posted in News | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Daily News Progress – Growing Awareness: A New Relationship With Food

Virginia Food Heritage Project, Interview with Tanya Denckla Cobb, by Becky Allen

“I heard about the Virginia Food Heritage Project from my friend, Patty Wallens, who know about seed-saving and such things. I was intrigued phizer viagra by the this idea of ‘Knowing our past – Growing our future,” and Patty put me in touch with Tanya Denckla Cobb, a UVa professor who teaches food system planning at the School of Architecture and is an environmental mediator in the University’s Institute for Environmental Negotiation…. ”  read the Virginia Food Heritage Project interview by Becky Allen

Posted in News | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

New U.S. Dept of Labor Rule on Youth Working on Farms Misguided

It was very hard for me to read about the new U.S. Department of Labor proposed rule on youth working on farms.  Many moons ago I worked at DOL (okay, several hundred moons ago, back in the 1980’s), where I was steeped in efforts to promote international labor rights. I worked on the U.N.’s International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions and international efforts to protect children from abusive working conditions. Why is the DOL now coming out with a proposed rule against youth working on farms? While children under the age of 16 would still be able to work on farms … Read More

Posted in Reclaiming Our Food Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Deer Hunting and the Local Food Movement

In “Hunting for Anthropologists: Deer Hunting and the Local Food Movement,” Elizabeth Danforth of the Iowa Food Systems Council makes a strong case that anthropologists can and should bridge the current knowledge gap between the culture of hunting and the local food movement. A powerful argument for connecting wild game, particularly deer, and the local food movement is the fact that deer herds multiply so quickly, doubling within three years, and hunters not only can help states prevent these rising deer populations from becoming a threat to travelers and farmers livelihoods but they can also provide relief to the hungry. Danforth … Read More

Posted in Reclaiming Our Food Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment