Join me on Sunday at Noon…

Join me on Sunday at Noon EST, talk about “Reclaiming Our Food” on Sheri Frey’s Easy Organic Gardener radio show http://t.co/tfsOPHBh

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Listen in! Learn more abo…

Listen in! Learn more about “Reclaiming Our Food” this Sunday on Sheri Frey’s Easy Organic Gardener radio show http://t.co/aW3m5o7c

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You know organic had real…

You know organic had really made it when folks want to fake generic cialis from india it! http://t.co/KHyht1vw

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Cluck and buzz for San Di…

Cluck and buzz for San Diego, where bees, chickens, and goats are now legal neighbors. http://t.co/72NV1vmR

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Urban tree gives $135 in …

Urban tree gives $135 in benefits, says Cornell; NYC trees worth $560 mill. What are benefits of urban food gardens? http://t.co/qDlr9Hga

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Green Bronx Machine

Green Bronx Machine “non-farmer” Stephen Ritz rocks TEDx with edible walls! http://t.co/8ODad2Rz

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New U.S. Dept of Labor Rule on Youth Working on Farms Misguided

It was very hard for me to read about the new U.S. Department of Labor proposed rule on youth working on farms.  Many moons ago I worked at DOL (okay, several hundred moons ago, back in the 1980’s), where I was steeped in efforts to promote international labor rights. I worked on the U.N.’s International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions and international efforts to protect children from abusive working conditions. Why is the DOL now coming out with a proposed rule against youth working on farms? While children under the age of 16 would still be able to work on farms … Read More

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Deer Hunting and the Local Food Movement

In “Hunting for Anthropologists: Deer Hunting and the Local Food Movement,” Elizabeth Danforth of the Iowa Food Systems Council makes a strong case that anthropologists can and should bridge the current knowledge gap between the culture of hunting and the local food movement. A powerful argument for connecting wild game, particularly deer, and the local food movement is the fact that deer herds multiply so quickly, doubling within three years, and hunters not only can help states prevent these rising deer populations from becoming a threat to travelers and farmers livelihoods but they can also provide relief to the hungry. Danforth … Read More

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Selling Out or Selling Smart? Finding Common Ground

A kerfuffle is ruffling feathers within the local food movement flock. Instead of plucking worms and bugs from the grass, some are now beginning to peck at each other. While this is a sure sign of a movement that is maturing, as predictable as teenage kids arguing over who “started it,” it’s also a sign that our flock may be ready to roll our mobile chicken house into fresh pastures. As an environmental mediator, I’m always looking to find that pasture called common ground, where shared interests are identified and met in a way that keeps the claws and beaks … Read More

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Let’s Not Lose Mom and Apple Pie to McMom

Is anyone else bothered by McDonald’s new advertisement that tries to convince us that breakfast at the drive-through window is as good as an old-fashioned breakfast served up by mom? Affordability and speed, these have been the standard fast food advertising pitch for years. All of these sales pitches can be (and have been) taken to task, of course. But trying to sell us on the idea that fast food is as good as it gets, is a real slap in the face to motherhood and apple pie. Believe it or not, there are mom’s out there – all around … Read More

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